Style Spotlight: Modernist Glamour

 

This post is part of a series highlighting the design styles we feature on our Pinterest.  Follow along as we explore these styles, and learn how you can apply them to your own home!

It may be January, but we aren't quite ready to say goodbye to the glitz and glamour of December's holidays.  This month we're looking at Modernist Glamour style.  The modernist movement of the 19th and 20th centuries rejected the use of purely decorative motifs in art and interiors, preferring an emphasis on the material itself, as well as form.  

STRONG GEOMETRIC & GRAPHIC ELEMENTS

While we're using the term "modernist" loosely, the rooms in this collection definitely favor form and shape over pattern and surface decoration.  The interior architecture of the living room below includes quite a bit of detail, but repetition of the rectangular shape throughout the space keeps it graphic and bold rather than classic and staid.  Notice how the designer even carried the detail to the area rug and quadruple cocktail tables.  

 Living room by Pablo Paniagua.

Living room by Pablo Paniagua.

The pedestal table base in this dining room by Achille Salvagni echoes classic shapes, but in a silhouetted manner that is decidedly modern.  Brass detailing on the edges accentuates the effect.

 Dining Room by Achille Salvagni, as featured in Elle Decor.

Dining Room by Achille Salvagni, as featured in Elle Decor.

 

RICH TEXTURE & MATERIAL

Although there's nary a floral or novelty print to be found, these rooms are certainly not lacking in visual interest.  They rely instead on decadent, layered textures: lots of velvet, silk, lacquer, and metal, punctuated by exotic accents in shagreen (stingray skin), shell, rare marble, and more.  How many types of texture do you see in the bedroom below?  We count at least eight...

 Bedroom by Jackie Astier as featured in Elle Decor.

Bedroom by Jackie Astier as featured in Elle Decor.

But if we're boiling it down, a Modernist Glamour space really has to include velvet.  Lustrous, rich, and deliciously tactile, this material really brings the glam.

 Living Room by Frank Roop.

Living Room by Frank Roop.

LIMITED, SOPHISTICATED USE OF COLOR

In the same way that these spaces rely on the subtle interplay of texture, they tend to use color strategically as well.  You won't see a lot of bold, allover color schemes, but rather subtle, tonal layers of color.  Where there is major contrast, it tends to be in one single shot, as in the orchid-toned art in the nearly monochromatic room below.  In terms of color choice, these spaces favor cool-toned greys, burgundy or purple, all shades of blue, and white. -AHI

 Living Room by David Collins Studio.

Living Room by David Collins Studio.

 Bedroom by Peter Mikic.

Bedroom by Peter Mikic.


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