Home Tour: Bold + Opulent in Paris

 

There could be no better follow-up to last week's post on Modernist Glamour than today's home tour, an impossibly glamorous apartment fit (literally) for royalty--in this case, a Middle Eastern princess making her first home in the city.  Designer Jean-Louis Deniot renovated the nearly 500 square meter home for the first time since the 19th century building was completed.

In the living room pictured below, a design of concentric arcs and straight lines graces both the ceiling and floor, a favorite trick of the designer also seen in his Chicago project.  The shapes are echoed again in a pair of half-moon sofas, modern klismos occasional chairs, and sconces.  Deniot balances the dynamic impact of all those circular shapes with an underlying symmetrical layout, which keeps the room from spinning.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

The apartment's other spaces are equally self-referential.  In the breakfast room, below left, lines of a sputnik-esque crystal light fixture are echoed by the table base, on the backdrop of hand-painted walls that recall quartz.  A more subtle approach is taken with a tonal geometric pattern on the walls of the study, which in picks up on the brass desk's faceted form.  Even the lines of the coffee table seem to run into the pattern of the carpeting.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

This kind of overload in pattern and texture really only works because of the flat's limited color palette of dreamy blue-greens and layered neutrals.  If you can imagine the same apartment, but with a varied color scheme in each room, it would be positively overwhelming.  

Speaking of overload, the media room pictured below really pushes the envelope--but it works.  Although nearly every surface is patterned, most of the ornamentation appears in low-contrast color tones, which is what saves the space.  Would you live here?  How about if the walls were a solid white or cream instead of the horizontal stripe?

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

We'll finish with the master suite, because it's just plain beautiful.  This is the only other space in the apartment featuring that dreamy blue-green tone from the living room, but it appears here as a richer, deeper version.  The custom canopy is undeniably grand, but the bed itself is a rather low, contemporary number, and the bedside tables are petite as well.  That kind of contrast keeps things modern, and makes this a room for living in rather than merely looking at.  

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

Design by Jean-Louis Deniot, as featured in Elle Decor.  Photography by Simon Upton.

What do you think--gorgeous and glam, or too much for really living in?  -AHI


For more of this space, visit the original article as posted by Elle Decor here.  For more by designer Jean-Louis Deniot, check out his portfolio here.

 

Style Spotlight: Modernist Glamour

 

This post is part of a series highlighting the design styles we feature on our Pinterest.  Follow along as we explore these styles, and learn how you can apply them to your own home!

It may be January, but we aren't quite ready to say goodbye to the glitz and glamour of December's holidays.  This month we're looking at Modernist Glamour style.  The modernist movement of the 19th and 20th centuries rejected the use of purely decorative motifs in art and interiors, preferring an emphasis on the material itself, as well as form.  

STRONG GEOMETRIC & GRAPHIC ELEMENTS

While we're using the term "modernist" loosely, the rooms in this collection definitely favor form and shape over pattern and surface decoration.  The interior architecture of the living room below includes quite a bit of detail, but repetition of the rectangular shape throughout the space keeps it graphic and bold rather than classic and staid.  Notice how the designer even carried the detail to the area rug and quadruple cocktail tables.  

Living room by Pablo Paniagua.

Living room by Pablo Paniagua.

The pedestal table base in this dining room by Achille Salvagni echoes classic shapes, but in a silhouetted manner that is decidedly modern.  Brass detailing on the edges accentuates the effect.

Dining Room by Achille Salvagni, as featured in Elle Decor.

Dining Room by Achille Salvagni, as featured in Elle Decor.

 

RICH TEXTURE & MATERIAL

Although there's nary a floral or novelty print to be found, these rooms are certainly not lacking in visual interest.  They rely instead on decadent, layered textures: lots of velvet, silk, lacquer, and metal, punctuated by exotic accents in shagreen (stingray skin), shell, rare marble, and more.  How many types of texture do you see in the bedroom below?  We count at least eight...

Bedroom by Jackie Astier as featured in Elle Decor.

Bedroom by Jackie Astier as featured in Elle Decor.

But if we're boiling it down, a Modernist Glamour space really has to include velvet.  Lustrous, rich, and deliciously tactile, this material really brings the glam.

Living Room by Frank Roop.

Living Room by Frank Roop.

LIMITED, SOPHISTICATED USE OF COLOR

In the same way that these spaces rely on the subtle interplay of texture, they tend to use color strategically as well.  You won't see a lot of bold, allover color schemes, but rather subtle, tonal layers of color.  Where there is major contrast, it tends to be in one single shot, as in the orchid-toned art in the nearly monochromatic room below.  In terms of color choice, these spaces favor cool-toned greys, burgundy or purple, all shades of blue, and white. -AHI

Living Room by David Collins Studio.

Living Room by David Collins Studio.

Bedroom by Peter Mikic.

Bedroom by Peter Mikic.


GET THE LOOK at Austin Home Interiors